The Following Quotes are from the Agnostic David Berlinski’s (PhD) book, “The Devil’s Delusion”

The Good SamaritanAnd the greatest that these is love

Many times Christians mistakenly equate an atheist with an agnostic.  The first demands that God does not and cannot exist, the second affirms “that nothing is known or can be known of the existence or nature of God or of anything beyond material phenomena; a person who claims neither faith nor disbelief in God.”1

We as Believers must remind ourselves that unbelievers CAN perceive truth (though very limited at times), as well as believers.

Wisdom is not knowledge, if this was true, the scientists would be the wisest among us.

According to the Bible, “wisdom is the correct application of knowledge.” (see the sometimes failed life of Solomon)

As Christians we should always display grace and humility when presenting the gospel to unbelievers. This should be obvious. 

However, even more importantly, it is in our day-to-day relationships and interactions with all people (especially unbelievers), that the love of God needs not only to be displayed, but acted out in tangible ways.

I have spent most of my adult Christ life failing at this, and worst yet is the times I have not even attempted to do so.

I have been guilty of arrogance, condescension and being a “KNOW IT ALL.”

For all those that I’ve abused, please forgive me for my lack of being more like Christ, a goal I shall never even get close too, but should grow more get older, and be more naturally displayed; as I recognize his love, grace and forgiveness of the wretched man that I am.

We are all sinners, and will continue to be so until we give up these earthly bodies.

As believers we need to be open and listen to people, something I still cannot do very well.

We need to consider what unbelievers may or may not believe, make no assumptions, but practice “Active Listening,” because of our willing choice to love others.

The biblical word for real love (Verb: agapaō; Noun: agapē), God’s type of love is NOT based upon emotions, which is always based upon reaction and is conditional

God’s type of love is not merited, earned, or achievable on its own.  It is a simple act of putting someone else before yourself. 

Never better seen than witnessed when the God of this universe gave His own Son for the sins of the world, for those that would have faith in this fact and not their own works.  The act of faith is a daily choosing that the child of God has.  And the greatest choice to faithe,3 is to love someone else (1st Corinthians 13).

What is amazing is that the following agnostic, speaks enough truth, which should be considered by those that call themselves atheist.

These quotes are from an agnostic PhD.2, who appears to be open to truth, at least on some level. 

“If science has shown that God does not exist, it has not been by appealing to Big Bang cosmology. The hypothesis of God’s existence and the facts of contemporary cosmology are consistent.”

― David Berlinski, The Devil’s Delusion: Atheism and its Scientific Pretensions

“Perhaps the best argument in favor of the thesis that the Big Bang supports theism,” the astrophysicist Christopher Isham has observed, “is the obvious unease with which it is greeted by some atheist physicists.”

― David Berlinski, The Devil’s Delusion: Atheism and its Scientific Pretensions

“Has anyone provided proof of God’s inexistence? Not even close. Has quantum cosmology explained the emergence of the universe or why it is here? Not even close. Have our sciences explained why our universe seems to be fine-tuned to allow for the existence of life? Not even close. Are physicists and biologists willing to believe in anything so long as it is not religious thought? Close enough. Has rationalism and moral thought provided us with an understanding of what is good, what is right, and what is moral? Not close enough. Has secularism in the terrible 20th century been a force for good? Not even close, to being close. Is there a narrow and oppressive orthodoxy in the sciences? Close enough. Does anything in the sciences or their philosophy justify the claim that religious belief is irrational? Not even in the ball park. Is scientific atheism a frivolous exercise in intellectual contempt? Dead on.”

― David Berlinski, The Devil’s Delusion: Atheism and Its Scientific Pretensions

“Arguments follow from assumptions, and assumptions follow from beliefs, and very rarely—perhaps never—do beliefs reflect an agenda determined entirely by the facts.”

― David Berlinski, The Devil’s Delusion: Atheism and its Scientific Pretensions

“What Hitler did not believe and what Stalin did not believe and what Mao did not believe and what the SS did not believe and what the Gestapo did not believe and what the NKVD did not believe and what the commissars, functionaries, swaggering executioners, Nazi doctors, Communist Party theoreticians, intellectuals, Brown Shirts, Black Shirts, gauleiters, and a thousand party hacks did not believe was that God was watching what they were doing. And as far as we can tell, very few of those carrying out the horrors of the twentieth century worried overmuch that God was watching what they were doing either. That is, after all, the meaning of a secular society.”

― David Berlinski, The Devil’s Delusion: Atheism and Its Scientific Pretensions

“If moral statements are about something, then the universe is not quite as science suggests it is, since physical theories, having said nothing about God, say nothing about right or wrong, good or bad. To admit this would force philosophers to confront the possibility that the physical sciences offer a grossly inadequate view of reality. And since philosophers very much wish to think of themselves as scientists, this would offer them an unattractive choice between changing their allegiances or accepting their irrelevance.”

― David Berlinski, The Devil’s Delusion: Atheism and its Scientific Pretensions

“What Hitler did not believe and what Stalin did not believe and what Mao did not believe and what the SS did not believe and what the Gestapo did not believe and what the NKVD did not believe and what the commissars, functionaries, swaggering executioners, Nazi doctors, Communist Party theoreticians, intellectuals, Brown Shirts, Black Shirts, gauleiters, and a thousand party hacks did not believe was that God was watching what they were doing. And as far as we can tell, very few of those carrying out the horrors of the twentieth century worried overmuch that God was watching what they were doing either. That is, after all, the meaning of a secular society.”

― David Berlinski, The Devil’s Delusion: Atheism and Its Scientific Pretensions

“If moral statements are about something, then the universe is not quite as science suggests it is, since physical theories, having said nothing about God, say nothing about right or wrong, good or bad. To admit this would force philosophers to confront the possibility that the physical sciences offer a grossly inadequate view of reality. And since philosophers very much wish to think of themselves as scientists, this would offer them an unattractive choice between changing their allegiances or accepting their irrelevance.”

― David Berlinski, The Devil’s Delusion: Atheism and its Scientific Pretensions

“Just who has imposed on the suffering human race poison gas, barbed wire, high explosives, experiments in eugenics, the formula for zyklon b, heavy artillery, pseudo-scientific justifications for mass murder, cluster bombs, attack submarines, napalm, intercontinental missiles , military space platforms and nuclear weapons? If memory serves it was not the Vatican.”

― David Berlinski, The Devil’s Delusion: Atheism and Its Scientific Pretensions

“Commentators who today talk of ‘The Dark Ages’ when faith instead of reason was said to ruthlessly rule, have for their animadversions only the excuse of perfect ignorance. Both Aquinas’ intellectual gifts and his religious nature were of a kind that is no longer commonly seen in the Western world.”

― David Berlinski, The Devil’s Delusion: Atheism and Its Scientific Pretensions

“The argument that Hawking has offered may be conveyed by question-and-answer, as in the Catholic catechism.   A Catechism of Quantum Cosmology Q: From what did our universe evolve? A: Our universe evolved from a much smaller, much emptier mini-universe. You may think of it as an egg. Q: What was the smaller, emptier universe like? A: It was a four-dimensional sphere with nothing much inside it. You may think of that as weird. Q: How can a sphere have four dimensions? A: A sphere may have four dimensions if it has one more dimension than a three-dimensional sphere. You may think of that as obvious. Q: Does the smaller, emptier universe have a name? A: The smaller, emptier universe is called a de Sitter universe. You may think of that as about time someone paid attention to de Sitter. Q: Is there anything else I should know about the smaller, emptier universe? A: Yes. It represents a solution to Einstein’s field equations. You may think of that as a good thing. Q: Where was that smaller, emptier universe or egg? A: It was in the place where space as we know it did not exist. You may think of it as a sac. Q: When was it there? A: It was there at the time when time as we know it did not exist. You may think of it as a mystery. Q: Where did the egg come from? A: The egg did not actually come from anywhere. You may think of this as astonishing. Q: If the egg did not come from anywhere, how did it get there? A: The egg got there because the wave function of the universe said it was probable. You may think of this as a done deal. Q: How did our universe evolve from the egg? A: It evolved by inflating itself up from its sac to become the universe in which we now find ourselves. You may think of that as just one of those things. This catechism, I should add, is not a parody of quantum cosmology. It is quantum cosmology.”

― David Berlinski, The Devil’s Delusion: Atheism and its Scientific Pretensions

“A defense [of religion] is needed because none has been forthcoming. The discussion has been ceded to men who regard religious belief with frivolous contempt. Their books have in recent years poured from every press, and although differing widely in their style, they are identical in their message: Because scientific theories are true, religious beliefs must be false.”

― David Berlinski, The Devil’s Delusion: Atheism and Its Scientific Pretensions

“No scientific theory touches on the mysteries that the religious tradition addresses. A man asking why his days are short and full of suffering is not disposed to turn to algebraic quantum field theory for the answer. The answers that prominent scientific figures have offered are remarkable in their shallowness.”

― David Berlinski, The Devil’s Delusion: Atheism and its Scientific Pretensions

“Did you imagine that science was a disinterested pursuit of the truth? Well, you were wrong.”

― David Berlinski, The Devil’s Delusion: Atheism and its Scientific Pretensions

“Science without religion is lame, religion without science is blind.” The lame and the blind excepted, who could object?”

― David Berlinski, The Devil’s Delusion: Atheism and its Scientific Pretensions

“After comparing more than two thousand DNA samples, an American molecular geneticist, Dean Hamer, concluded that a person’s capacity to believe in God is linked to his brain chemicals. Of all things! Why not his urine? Perhaps it will not be amiss to observe that Dr. Hamer has made the same claim about homosexuality, and if he has refrained from arguing that a person’s capacity to believe in molecular genetics is linked to a brain chemical, it is, no doubt, owing to a prudent sense that once that door is open God knows how and when anyone will ever slam it shut again.”

― David Berlinski, The Devil’s Delusion: Atheism and Its Scientific Pretensions

 

Footnote

1. Google Online Dictionary

(https://www.google.com/search?client=firefox-b-1-d&q=agnostic)

 

2. Background (short version)

“Berlinski was a research assistant in molecular biology at Columbia University, and was a research fellow at the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA) in Austria and the Institut des Hautes Études Scientifiques (IHES) in France.

Author – Mathematics and biology

Berlinski has written works on systems analysis, the history of differential topology, analytic philosophy, and the philosophy of mathematics.  Berlinski has authored books for the general public on mathematics and the history of mathematics.  These include A Tour of the Calculus (1995) on calculus, The Advent of the Algorithm (2000) on algorithms, Newton’s Gift (2000) on Isaac Newton, and Infinite Ascent: A Short History of Mathematics (2005).  Another book, The Secrets of the Vaulted Sky (2003), compares astrological and evolutionary accounts of human behavior.  In Black Mischief (1988), Berlinski wrote “Our paper became a monograph.  When we had completed the details, we rewrote everything so that no one could tell how we came upon our ideas or why.  This is the standard in mathematics.”

Berlinski’s books have received mixed reviews; Newton’s Gift and The Advent of the Algorithm were criticized by MathSciNet for containing historical and mathematical inaccuracies while the Mathematical Association of America review of A Tour of the Calculus by Fernando Q. Gouvêa recommended that professors have students read the book to appreciate the overarching historical and philosophical picture of calculus.” (Wikipedia)

 

3Faith ~ “Holman Bible Dictionary”

Faith – “Trusting commitment of one person to another, particularly a person to God.  Faith is the central concept of Christianity.  One may be called a Christian only if one has faith.  Our English word “faith” comes from the Latin fides, as developed through the old French words fei and feid.  In Middle English (1150-1475) “faith” replaced a word that eventually evolved into “belief.”  “Faith” came to mean “loyalty to a person to whom one is bound by promise or duty.”  Faith was fidelity.  “Belief” came to be distinguished from faith as an intellectual process having to do with the acceptance of a proposition.  The verb form of “faith” dropped out of English usage towards the end of the sixteenth century.”

In the English, the verb form of faith would have been spelled “faithé,” or “faitheth,” or “faithing.”

It is these three verb forms of faith that fell out of usage in the late fifteenth century just prior to the culmination of the Greek Textus Receptus into the English translations of the Bible, which included the King James Version.

New Testament Expressions – “The Greek noun, Pistis (faith), is related to the verb pisteuo (I have faith, trust, believe).  The noun and the verb are found virtually everywhere in the New Testament, with the notable exception that the noun is absent altogether from John’s Gospel and occurs only once in 1st John.  The verb form does not occur in Philemon, 2nd Peter 2 and 3, John, or Revelation.”

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